Posts Tagged ‘Wolfe Law Group’

What is a Construction Change Directive (CCD)?

construction change directive

The construction industry, just as any other industry has its own terminology or lingo. There are many examples such as “punch-list,” “lien” and “substantial completion” to name a few. No words are more dreaded than change order. Construction change orders are some of the most litigated and disputed documents in all of construction law.

A cousin of the change order, is the construction change directive. Although the names are similar the legal implications are significantly different. The construction change directive may be even more disputed than the construction change order but it is not as widely used. This post will help to familiarize readers with what exactly a construction change directive entails.

Definition of Construction Change Directive

I found a quick definition of construction change directive:

An alternate mechanism for directing the contractor to perform additional work to the contract when time and/or cost of the work is not in agreement between the owner and contractor performing the work.

at DictionaryOfConstruction.com.

To break down this definition, one must look to its parts. First, its an alternative mechanism, meaning that there are other way  to accomplish the goal of the owner/architect. Second, it directs the “contractor” to perform additional work. Its not a request but rather a directive. Lastly, its a directive given by the owner when time and/or cost are not in agreement. This is vastly different from the change order, which has to be agreed to by the contractor and owner.

Basically this is an order to do something even though there is no agreement as to timing and/or price. This type of authoritarian mechanism is prone for heavy dispute.

Application of the Construction Change Directive

The application of the construction change directive is less complicated than its definition. The AIA G714 is a single page document that basically has four sections.

  1. A section containing all of the project information which is standard on any contract document which includes a brief description of the change that is being directed;
  2. The proposed adjustment with regards to price;
  3. The proposed adjustment with regards to time; and
  4. The signature blocks for the Architect, Owner (required) and Contractor (no signature required for contractor).

Once this document is filled out and signed by the owner and architect,  it needs delivery to the contractor for effectiveness. This is a bold and powerful document.

Construction Change Directive: Risks and Rewards

As with any document, whether it be an agreed upon change order or a construction change directive, there are inherent risks involved with taking on new work. The owner has to weigh the risks and rewards with taking such bold move in order to get what it wants. This move could backfire and be costly for the owner and/or negate any damages for delay that the owner may have against the general contractor because of the forced additional work.

Its important to speak with an experienced attorney when dealing with complex procedures on a construction project. Click here or call 504-894-9653 for more information.

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Posted in:     Change Orders, Construction Contracts, Construction News, Damages, Delays  /  Tags: , , ,   /   Leave a comment

I’ve Received Contractor Lawsuit. What Happens Next?

Builder Ripping Up A Contract Lawsuit

The project is either over or it is winding down, money and tensions are getting tight. Contractors know this scenario very well. The problem arises when a lawsuit is delivered because of the dispute. Many contractors do not know what to do once they receive a lawsuit. This post will outline the possibilities of what happens after the lawsuit is received.

Why Did I Receive A Lawsuit?

On a typical construction project, whether public or private, commercial or residential, there are typical players. These players include: the owner, general or prime contractor, subcontractors, laborers, suppliers and equipment lessors. All of these parties have the ability to file a lawsuit and/or receive a lawsuit, depending on the facts of the situation.

In actuality, you have received this lawsuit because of your involvement in the project and someone in this group has alleged that you are liable for some type of damage. This undoubtedly will be money damages. Other types of damages exist but courts like to compensate with money.

What Happens Once I Am Served With The Lawsuit

The clock starts running! No matter the jurisdiction, whether it be state or federal court or in Louisiana or another state, the time to respond to the lawsuit begins to run once service is made. Depending on the jurisdictions for which I am familiar you have anywhere from ten to sixty days to respond. The usual here in Louisiana is fifteen days from service in a state court, see La. C.C.P. 1001.

Many times if you contact an attorney they can get an extension of time for which to file and answer or other responsive pleadings. This is customary in our business.

Options With The Lawsuit

There are a few options that I see people do when they receive a lawsuit, some are advisable and others are inadvisable.

Hire An Attorney: The first, most logical and most advisable option is to contact your attorney and retain his services to defend you in the lawsuit. An attorney will know the landscape of the Court procedures and assure that you will be protected within the confines of the law. Attorneys are not miracle workers, but they have a number of strategic and tactical maneuvers which can be deployed to protect you or your company’s interests.

The flaw here is that lawyers are not cheap. A good lawyer will tell you whether the amount and nature of your dispute are worth fighting over. Many times its a better business choice to work out a deal and move on with making money.

Self-representation: I see this more and more these days. A person can always represent themselves in a court of law. The Fourteenth and Sixteenth Amendments have been interpreted through the years to allow individuals to represent themselves pro se in court. The key here is individuals representing themselves. A corporation or limited liability company is not an individual. They are juridical entities, which cannot be represented in court unless by an attorney.

Due to the fact that most smart business owners are some type of business entity, courts will not allow for self-representation. Self-representation can be advisable in some situations, but most of the time it is not.

Do nothing: This option is popular, but it is disfavored and inadvisable. When a party who is sued does nothing, the suing party can get a judgment by default. Once a judgment is rendered against the party who is sued, then bank accounts, garnishments and property are all options for a quick collection.

Instead of doing nothing, if you file and answer or other responsive pleading, the judicial process will take much longer and you have many other legal moves at your disposal.

Other options: – Informal negotiations or ADR clause are other options. Once you have been sued and within the time frame to answer, you and/or your company could engage in informal negotiations with the adversary. I always encourage my clients to work out a deal and move on. This can be with informal meetings or telephone calls. Its always smart to bring in an attorney to help here, even if not for the full lawsuit.

Finally, many construction contracts have some type of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) clause. Even with these clauses present an adversary may still file suit contrary to the contract. This can be done for a number of legitimate reasons. All you or your attorney have to do is enforce the ADR clause. This can be done informally or via formal court Motion.

Conclusion

Once a lawsuit is received by a party to a construction project, there are a number of options, as discussed above, which can be implemented. The key here is to do something and avoid a default judgment. Contacting an attorney for advice is a smart play, even if it is to decide which of the above methods is best for you.

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Posted in:     About Our Services, Construction Contracts, Litigation, Louisiana  /  Tags: , , , ,   /   Leave a comment

Commercial Debt Collection – How Do I Collect When A Company Owes Me Money?

 businessman with financial symbols coming from hand

In today’s business culture we call businesses working with other businesses B2B. It has always been a popular practice to the alternative, business to consumer. The rules are different governing B2B as opposed to B2C. The legal and business world assume that the B2B relationship and players are more sophisticated.

This post discusses what happens when the B2B relationship sours and one company must collect what it is owed from another company. The most important distinction between the rules of B2B and B2C is that consumers are much more protected by government regulation. The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act protects the consumer, not businesses.

Phases of Collection

Most business think that when an account is overdue, then they call up a debt collection agency and the debt will be collected or its deemed bad debt. Businesses write off huge percentages of accounts receivable every year based off this flawed thinking.

There are at least two phases of debt collection, each of which could arguably be broken down into subcategories. You have a pre-debt fact gathering and document filing stage, as the first phase. Then there is the actual debt collection which can consist of many different options and this occurs after the debt is due. So more of a pre/post mindset.

Pre-Collection Phase – Getting Your Ducks In A Row

The pre-collection phase is often over looked and much more important than the post-collection phase. It is the foundation for the collection. This is the fact gathering and organizational portion.

This phase includes the initial fact gathering on the business. Your business should have an in-take sheet whereby it gathers all important information from the other business. Some of my clients even go as far as running credit checks on the business or getting personal guarantees from its senior members.

For contractors, suppliers and equipment lessors that I represent, this pre-collection phase is essential to keeping the accounts receivable low. This phase also includes sending out notices and filing liens, in a timely manner and properly. All of these essential elements make the post-collection process much easier, more efficient and most importantly successful. The old adage that I preach, is an ounce of prevention equals a pound of cure.

Finally another important aspect of the pre-collection phase is a well written contract between you company and your business client. This contract should have specific default and attorney fee provisions.

Collection Phase – It’s Time To Get Paid

Now your company has all of its intake information, gathered credit reports, personal guarantees, sent your notices, filed your liens, and have a well written contract, but your business client refuses to pay on its obligation to your company, what do you do?

There are a few options here and  only one good solution. Your business could write off the debt, it could try to collect internally, hire a debt collection agency or contact an attorney to collect. Obviously I’m biased here, but I do see this often. Writing off the debt is never good. Collecting internally can be okay but its slightly less successful than a debt collector. Attorneys can do all of the following steps which make the percentage chance of collection go up.

Your commercial debt collection attorney has a number of weapons at his disposal to collect on the outstanding debt. Many of them have time delays built in by law, which slows the process. First is to send a demand letter which includes the Louisiana Open Account Statue language. This is another avenue to get attorney fees and costs associated with the debt collection.

After the demand letter is sent out and thirty (30) days elapse, then its time to file suit against the debtor. Many businesses balk at this option because litigation can be costly and risky. Depending on the size of your debt, you attorney will likely take it on contingency which will minimize the litigation costs. From there your attorney will get a judgment, either by default or after trial.

Once the judgment is obtained, there are a number of possible means of collection. The attorney can examine the assets of the debtor, in a judgment debtor rule hearing whereby the debtor will be sworn-in and give testimony as to what the business owns. Further, the attorney can garnish banking and physical assets of the business. The judgment will be good for ten years and can thereafter be reinscribed. Once a judgment is granted collection chances go up.

Conclusion

In the end, some debts are simply bad and cannot be collected. Others, however may just be tricky or require persistence. Having a good commercial debt collection attorney at your side will greatly increase your collection rates and keep your accounts receivables low.

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Posted in:     Collections, Litigation, Louisiana  /  Tags: , , , , ,   /   1 Comment

Get An Attorney To Read Your Construction Contract – Every Time

read-construction-contract

At the start of every construction project you sign a stack of papers that will dictate your success or failure on the project: the construction contract.  The contract may be short and sweet, or it may be a mountain of paperwork that not only includes its own provisions but also cites provisions in other paperwork stacks.

Construction contracts are historically confusing documents and they contain a bunch of popular provisions with confusing interpretations like pay when paid clauses, indemnity provisions, claim notice requirements, and more. Plus, the provision may mean one thing under one state law and something completely different under another state’s law.

What can you do?

Get An Attorney To Review Every Contract

Last year, Seth Smiley wrote an article on our blog suggesting that with construction contracts you should “pay now to save later.” The point of this title and article simply underscored the importance of spending a little time with the contract language at the very start of the projects.

Perhaps your company actually pays money for an attorney to review the contract, or maybe they pay by putting in some quality time to review the document themselves. Whatever the case, it’s important to give construction contracts serious review before starting to work underneath it.

Having an attorney review your construction contract does not need to be complicated. In fact, here at Wolfe Law Group, we offer a flat fee for contract review services. Provide the contract documents to us, and we’ll turn around a review in a day or two. The review will include an opinion letter that sets forth two major things:

  • Provisions that should be concerning and perhaps changed (i.e. Alerts)
  • Provisions that require you to perform certain actions during the course of the project (i.e. Notification Lists)
  • Answers to any specific questions you may have

Having an attorney review your contract at the onset of a project will give your company peace of mind about their duties under the terms, and will help your company avoid bad situations.

Don’t Underestimate The Power Of The Contract

It’s unfortunate, but a lot of companies spend a great deal of time preparing their bid and selling their company to get a project. When they finally get the job, the salesperson, estimator, or business owner is ecstatic and just wants to get started. That’s understandable, but don’t allow the owner or general contractor to take advantage of your position and pass you a construction contract that is one-sided against you.

A strong contract that has provisions to the owner’s or general contractor’s favor can be crushing to a business in the event of a dispute, payment delay, or more.

Don’t let your excitement or desire for the project get ahead of you. General contractors and owners will negotiate a contract with you, and they expect push back on certain terms. If you allow them to roll over your company, however, they will.

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Posted in:     Construction Contracts  /  Tags: , , ,   /   Leave a comment

Preliminary Notice and Mechanics Lien Compliance: How?

mechanics-lien-compliance

Getting paid in the construction industry is an art, especially for subcontractors and suppliers who must rely on payment to trickle down from the property owner, through the general contractor, and sometimes through even more parties.

Offsetting these complexities are state laws that provide subcontractors and suppliers with “mechanics lien” rights. These rights have existed in the United States since Thomas Jefferson introduced the first lien legislation more than 220 years ago. Today, the rights are as strong as they ever were.

One huge problem, however, is that companies must comply with the mechanics lien law’s notice and timetable requirements to preserve these mechanics lien rights. This is a minor headache if you do business in a single state, but as soon as you start expanding into other jurisdictions, balancing the paperwork load and differing laws in each jurisdiction becomes absolutely impossible.

What can you do?

1) Dedicate Your Company To Mechanics Lien Compliance

You may be tempted to avoid lien compliance simply because it’s so complicated. It’s easy to pretend that ‘it isn’t worth it’ or that ‘liens don’t work’ to avoid the daunting task of staying compliant with each state’s rules. The rules really do vary from state-to-state and circumstance-to-circumstance, and they are very complicated.

Nevertheless, savvy companies understand that the juice is worth the squeeze with mechanics lien compliance.

Adopting a Lien Policy and sticking to it could realistically drop your non-collectable debt percentage to near 0%; a key performance indicator (KPI) that could literally make your company millions of dollars.

Your company can be dedicated to mechanics lien compliance until their ears bleed, but without a way to actually comply, it won’t matter. For too long, companies have had to compromise their lien rights because compliance was impossible. As the next section explains, however, that’s no longer the case.

2) Use Technology To Manage The Mechanics Lien Laws

If you’re using Microsoft Excel or Outlook to manage your mechanics lien deadlines, you’re making a mistake. If you’re using a service provider and paying them per project to manually (yes, they are doing it manually) track and notify you of your mechanics lien deadlines, than you’re making a mistake.

It is a rare day when a company would rely on a manual process or a spreadsheet to track all of their invoices, expenses, or other accounting items; wouldn’t you agree?  Why in the world then would a company use these same error prone and laborious methods to track something so complicated as lien rights?

Historically, the answer to this was simply that there wasn’t any other choice. The times has changed, however, and there is a great technology available to help companies manage these lien and notice requirements.  Take, for instance, the zlien platform which completely automates the preliminary notice process and manages all mechanics lien and bond claim rights.

It is essential that your company rely on a technology to manage the lien compliance process, enabling the company to dedicate themselves to a lien policy, and resulting in a much better bottom line.

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Posted in:     Filing Requirements, Mechanics Lien  /  Tags: , ,   /   Leave a comment